Chinese Storytelling

Chinese Storytelling-->
History and Milieu

  1. The Eternal Storyteller

  2. The origins of professional storytelling in China

  3. Telling and singing figurines from the Han dynasty

  4. 'Transformation' performances from the Tang dynasty

  5. Professional storytelling during the Song dynasty

  6. Storytelling, storybooks and folkbooks from Yuan to Ming

  7. Four hundred years of Yangzhou storytelling

  8. Life of Liu Jingting (1587-ca.1670), ’Father of Chinese Storytelling’

  9. Liu Jingting in performance

  10. The milieu of storytelling in old Yangzhou

  11. The traditional storytellers' house - shuchang

  12. The storytelling event of the recent past

  13. Great Enlightenment Storytellers' House

  14. The storytelling event today

  15. Other arenas of storytelling


 

History and Milieu (9)

Liu Jingting, in performance

"The pockmarked Liu from Nanjing had a dark complexion and in his face there were lots of scars and pimples. He was careless and indifferent about his looks, as if he were made from clay or wood. He was a master in storytelling. He told one session of storytelling a day. The price was a tael of silver. Even if you came ten days ahead to make an appointment and pay the fee, you could not be sure he would be free ... I once heard him perform in the plain style of telling (without musical accompaniment) the tale of 'Wu Song fights the tiger on Jingyang Mountain', and it was very different from the version transmitted in books. His descriptions and illustrations went into the finest details, but he also knew where to cut the thread and make a pause, and he never became talkative. His voice rang out like a big bell. Whenever he came to an exciting point, he bellowed and raged so that the noise seemed to make the house fall down. At the point where Wu Song arrives in the inn and orders wine, there is nobody in the inn. At the sudden outcry of Wu Song, the empty jars and pots send out a ringing sound. Thus he would add colour to every interval, and he did his utmost in his care for detail. Only when his hosts were sitting quite attentively and cocking their ears to listen, would he begin to tell. But if he noticed some among the servants whispering to each other, or if the listeners were yawning or showing other signs of sleepiness, he would stop immediately, and nobody could force him to start again. Every evening when the tables had been wiped and the lamps snuffed, and the simple tea bowls were passed around in all calm, he would slowly begin to tell ... "

Extract from Zhang Dai (1597-1684?): Tao yan meng yi. Zhang Dai witnessed Liu Jingting’s performance in 1638.

Next: The milieu of storytelling in old Yangzhou